FAQ'S
Questions commonly asked about osteopathy...
Osteopathy is still a relatively new practice in the UK (despite being founded in 1892 by Dr Andrew Taylor Still!) so we often get asked questions about osteopathy from both new and existing patients! Here's a list of the most common ones but feel free to get in touch if you fancy finding out more!
FAQ'S
Questions commonly asked about osteopathy...
Osteopathy is still a relatively new practice in the UK (despite being founded in 1892 by Dr Andrew Taylor Still!) so we often get asked questions about osteopathy from both new and existing patients! Here's a list of the most common ones but feel free to get in touch if you fancy finding out more!
What is Osteopathy?
Osteopathy is a form of manual therapy which focuses on total body health by treating imbalances in the body's musculoskeletal framework. Using the osteopathic principles, practitoners improve the body's stability, mobilty and tension while encouraging tissue healing.
How does Osteopathy differ from other manual therapies?
Osteopathy is an holisitic practice which considers the involvement of all the body's systems and tissues when diagnosing and treating.  This differs from chiropractic as the focus is generally on the patient's spine. Osteopaths tend to use a hands on approach for diagnosis in comparison to physiotherapists.
What do Osteopaths treat?
Osteopaths treat a lot more than people realise! Symptoms associated with chronic conditions, spinal pain, joint pain, asthma, arthritis, whiplash, stress, pregnancy, sciatica, repetitive strain injuries and postural problems are just handful of the presentations which can benefit from osteopathic treatment.
Does Osteopathy hurt?
Osteopathy is normally quite gentle but cannot be guaranteed to be completely painless. Some techniques, such as deep tissue massage, can be uncomfortable but people often call it a "good pain", because they feel it is doing them good. Patients are asked for feedback throughout to ensure they are comfortable with the technique used. If the patient is concerned or uncomfortable with a particular method of treatment, another treatment approach can be used instead.
After treatment, it can be common to have some soreness and/or stiffness for up to 4 days. People often report this as being similar to post exercise soreness.
Is Osteopathy safe during pregnancy?
Yes however it is important your Osteopath knows you are pregnant so they can use the appropriate techniques for your condition.

Most Osteopaths refrain from treating until after 12 weeks gestation.
 
How many treatments will I need?
This varies for each patient. At the end of the first treatment, you will be advised as to the likely number of visits required and the intervals between. However, every patient will respond differently. There are many variables; such as how long the problem has been going on, the health and age of the patient, the person’s lifestyle/occupation and compliance with exercise and advice given. 
Can I bring a chaperone?
Yes that is fine! Sometimes it helps with remembering what your practitioner has advised too!

All patients under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a chaperone.
 
Are there any side effects from these treatments?
Almost all forms of therapy have potential side effects.
 
The most common side with osteopathy is tiredness after treatment or soreness for up to three days. A report of adverse effects from manual therapies can be viewed here.
How does Osteopathy differ from other manual therapies?
Osteopathy is an holisitic practice which considers the involvement of all the body's systems and tissues when diagnosing and treating.  This differs from chiropractic as the focus is generally on the patient's spine. Osteopaths tend to use a hands on approach for diagnosis in comparison to physiotherapists.
What do Osteopaths treat?
Osteopaths treat a lot more than people realise! Symptoms associated with chronic conditions, spinal pain, joint pain, asthma, arthritis, whiplash, stress, pregnancy, sciatica, repetitive strain injuries and postural problems are just handful of the presentations which can benefit from osteopathic treatment.
What is Osteopathy?
Osteopathy is a form of manual therapy which focuses on total body health by treating imbalances in the body's musculoskeletal framework. Using the osteopathic principles, practitoners improve the body's stability, mobilty and tension while encouraging tissue healing.
Does Osteopathy hurt?
Osteopathy is normally quite gentle but cannot be guaranteed to be completely painless. Some techniques, such as deep tissue massage, can be uncomfortable but people often call it a "good pain", because they feel it is doing them good. Patients are asked for feedback throughout to ensure they are comfortable with the technique used. If the patient is concerned or uncomfortable with a particular method of treatment, another treatment approach can be used instead.
After treatment, it can be common to have some soreness and/or stiffness for up to 4 days. People often report this as being similar to post exercise soreness.
Is Osteopathy safe during pregnancy?
Yes however it is important your Osteopath knows you are pregnant so they can use the appropriate techniques for your condition.

Most Osteopaths refrain from treating until after 12 weeks gestation.
 
How many treatments will I need?
This varies for each patient. At the end of the first treatment, you will be advised as to the likely number of visits required and the intervals between. However, every patient will respond differently. There are many variables; such as how long the problem has been going on, the health and age of the patient, the person’s lifestyle/occupation and compliance with exercise and advice given. 
Can I bring a chaperone?
Yes that is fine! Sometimes it helps with remembering what your practitioner has advised too!

All patients under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a chaperone.
 
Are there any side effects from these treatments?
Almost all forms of therapy have potential side effects.
 
The most common side with osteopathy is tiredness after treatment or soreness for up to three days. A report of adverse effects from manual therapies can be viewed here.